What is the environmentally friendly way to dispose of Crayola Model Magic?

Crayola® Model Magic®, whether still wet (as sold) or dried, may be disposed of as a household waste. There are no known restrictions for its transportation or disposal. Typical curbside-pickup household waste systems may be used for environmentally safe disposal.

If you have additional questions, we would love to hear from you! Feel free to call or text us at 18002729652 on weekdays between 9 AM and 4 PM Eastern Time.

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Throughout Crayola’s history, several crayon colours have been retired, marking significant moments in the evolution of our vibrant palette. 

1990
For the first time in Crayola history eight colours were retired and placed in the Crayola Hall of Fame: blue gray, green blue, lemon yellow, maize, orange red, orange yellow, raw umber, and violet blue. 

Eight new colours were added: cerulean, dandelion, fuchsia, jungle green, royal purple, teal blue, vivid tangerine, and wild strawberry. 

2003
Celebrating a century of bringing colour to the world, Crayola introduced four new colours named by Crayola fans! To make room for the new hues, we bid farewell to blizzard blue, magic mint, mulberry, and teal blue. 

The four new colours that were introduced are: inchworm, jazzberry jam, mango tango, and wild blue yonder. 

Kudos to our hue heroes – the consumers who voted in the Save the Shade” campaign, ensuring burnt sienna stayed in the pack. 

2017
To mark National Crayon Day on March 31st, we announced Dandelion was leaving the pack. To honor this iconic colour, we sent Dandelion on a retirement tour to his favorite places. His replacement, Bluetiful, was announced on May 52017.

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Because Crayola Marker components are securely sealed during the manufacturing process, we don’t recommend trying to remove the marker nib and reservoir to recycle the barrel. The marker caps can be recycled at facilities that accept #5 plastic. 

Green is more than just a colour to us! Click here to learn more about Crayola’s sustainability initiatives.

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There are no plans for a United Way sale in 2024. Crayola Canada continues to develop alternatives to support the United Way. 

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Crayola Crayons are made primarily from paraffin wax and colour pigment. Paraffin wax is made especially for Crayola by companies who extract it from products like wood and coal. Pigments come from various sources. They can be natural or man made substances. Pigments can be found in the earth, minerals and/​or made in laboratories. These raw materials are purchased from outside suppliers and are stored in our warehouse awaiting production. All of our raw materials are delivered by truck with the exception of paraffin wax, which is delivered in railroad cars. Further information is considered proprietary. If you need more information, please call us at (800) 2729652 weekdays between 9 AM and 4 PM Eastern Time. A representative will be happy to assist you.
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Silly Putty was discovered in 1943 by James Wright who mixed boric acid and silicone oil together. It was introduced to the public in 1950 by Peter Hodgson. Crayola acquired the exclusive manufacturing rights to Silly Putty in 1977. Although the exact formulas Crayola uses to make Silly Putty are proprietary, we can share it is made primarily from silicone and color pigments. 

Click hereto learn more about the birth of Silly Putty! This video works best in Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Microsoft Edge. 

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Crayola® did not invent the crayon. The modern” crayon originated in Europe, initially made from a mixture of charcoal and oil, later replaced by powdered pigments. Wax was later substituted for oil, making the sticks sturdier and easier to handle.

In 1902, Crayola Crayons were invented by Binney & Smith and first offered for sale in 1903. The trade name Crayola” was coined by Mrs. Edwin Binney, combining craie” (French for chalk stick) and oleaginous” (oily).

Crayola manufactures over 3 billion crayons each year, primarily made from paraffin wax and colour pigment. Learn more about Crayola’s colourful history here.

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In 1900, prior to the introduction of Crayola Crayons, we produced black marking crayons. These crayons were created with dry carbon black and different waxes. Today these are known as Staonal brand Marking Crayons and are used in many industrial settings.

The first box of Crayola Crayons was produced in 1903 as an 8‑count box. It sold for a nickel and contained the colours red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet, brown and black. Click here to view the History of Crayola Timeline.

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If your Crayola markers have become dry because the marker caps were left off for a brief time, we have some suggestions that may help! To revive water-based markers, such as Crayola regular, washable, or Ultra-Clean markers, you can try dipping the tip in warm water for about 5 seconds. After recapping the marker, we suggest waiting 24 hours before trying the marker again. If Crayola Gel Markers seem dry after remaining uncapped, try rubbing the marker back and forth on the drawing surface several times. If the marker still doesn’t work, replace the cap for 2 – 3 hours and then try using it again. If unsuccessful, you can dip the tip in warm water for about 5 seconds. After recapping the marker, wait 24 hours before attempting to use the marker again. Visi-Max Dry Erase Markers and Take Note! Dry Erase Markers are not water-based like traditional Crayola markers, and cannot be revived if they are allowed to dry out.
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